Autumn 2012

01 – Locomotion control of limbless robots using biomimetic neuron circuits

Details

Speaker: Guoyuan Li, PhD candidate, TAMS group, Dept. of Informatics, University of Hamburg

Time: Friday 19 October 2012, 13:00-14:00

Place: Åse Auditorium

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Abstract

This talk presents a central pattern generator (CPG) based on biomimetic neural circuits, to simulate the locomotion of limbless animals. The topology of the proposed CPG model is biologically inspired from the neuronal circuit diagram in the spinal cord of swimming lampreys. A set of leaky integrator type interneurons are then incorporated in the neural diagram design for rhythmic signal generation. To further generate adaptive locomotion, we also propose a closed-loop control scheme and extend the CPG model by employing global sensory feedback integration for online modulation of the CPG control parameters. Through genetic algorithm, adaptive locomotion is achieved by optimizing the amount and speed of sensory input that is fed back to the CPG model. Simulation and real on-site experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed control mechanism.

02 – Towards a more flexible Model-Driven Engineering

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Speaker: Juan De Lara, Professor, Department of Computer Science, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Time: Tuesday 30 October 2012, 14:00-15:00

Place: Aksla Auditorium

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Abstract

Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) proposes an active use of models in the different phases of software development. In this approach, models are used to specify, test, simulate, analyse and generate code for the final application. Hence, an MDE process necessitates from the definition of different kinds of model manipulations, like transforming models between different languages, in-place transformations, or code generation.

While it is possible to describe models using general purpose modelling languages, like the UML, the full potential of MDE is unfolded by the use of Domain Specific Modelling Languages (DSMLs), tailored to particular domains. In this way, MDE can be seen as areutilization approach, because DSMLs and their associated artefacts (transformations, code generators) can be reused across different projects within the domain. However, MDE artefacts are tied to specific DSMLs, and cannot be reused for other similar DSMLs sharing essential characteristics. The end result is that similar transformations have to be implemented repeatedly, even for DSMLs with small variations only.

In this talk, we will discuss several techniques enabling a more flexible use of MDE artefacts, so that they can be reused across different DSMLs. On the one hand, reusability can be obtained by the definition of artefacts over so called concepts, gathering the requirements expected from DSMLs for the artefact to be applicable on their instance models. On the other, families of DSMLs can be defined using multi-level modelling, so that artefacts can be defined and applied to sets of related DSMLs. These ideas will be illustrated with the definition of a catalogue of reusable model abstractions.

03 – Portable and easy-to-use operating systems for wireless sensor networks

Details

Speaker: Girts Strazdins, PhD candidate, Human Factors Lab, Faculty of Technology and Maritime Operations, Aalesund University College, Norway

Time: Friday 2 November 2012, 13:00-14:00 12:00-13:00 13:45-14:45 (NEW)

Place: Nørvasund Auditorium

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Abstract

In the last decade wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has evolved as a promising approach for smart investigation of our planet, providing solutions for environment and wild animal monitoring, security system development, human health telemonitoring and control, industrial manufacturing and other domains. This talk presents modular, C-language based sensor network operating system MansOS, and its object-oriented extension OOMOS, that are developed, based on existing WSN application requirement research. These portable systems with highly reusable code provide a rapid and effective WSN solution development environment for programmers.

04 – A sustainable dynamic allocation of patrolling tug vessels to oil ships along the northern Norwegian coast

Speaker: Brice Assimizele, PhD candidate, Faculty of Technology and Maritime Operations, Aalesund University College

Time: Friday 7 December 2012, 12:30-13:30

Place: Aksla Auditorium

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Abstract

In order to prevent or minimize the risk of oil tanker drifting accidents and corresponding environmental impacts, tug vessels are used and monitored by the Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) in Vardø to patrol every oil ship moving along the coastline. The VTS, managed by the Norwegian Coastal Administration (NCA) is faced by several challenges that need to be addressed. In fact, the dynamic and uncertain patrolling operations as well as the high expansion of the petroleum activity make the sustainable management and control of the fleet vessels a highly complex problem. This PhD thesis aims to assist the NCA by developing operations research-based green-models and algorithms. It is also envisioned that the results obtained will be applicable to related problems, such as fleet optimization of platform supply vessels (PSVs).

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